Question: Is The Duke In My Last Duchess A Reliable Narrator?

What does the Duke reveal about himself?

The Duke reveals himself to be an emotionally cold, calculating, materialistic, haughty, aristocratic connoisseur; on the positive side, he is a patron of such artists as Fra Pandolf and Claus of Innsbruck (both fictional)..

What didn’t the Duke like about the personality of his last duchess?

Ans- The Duke was dissatisfied with his last Duchess because he thought that she was not completed focused on him and was flirting with other people. The Duchess would smile at other people but the Duke wanted complete control and was jealous when the Duchess was friendly towards other people.

Who killed the Duchess?

Bosola imprisons the Duchess and her two younger children. In prison, a furious Ferdinand tricks the Duchess into believing that Antonio and her eldest son are both dead. Bosola pleads for her life, but the Duchess and her two children are strangled.

What is the duke in the midst of planning?

What is the Duke in the midst of planning? Browning draws the poem to a terrifying conclusion: some unlucky daughter of a Count will be the Duke’s next Duchess.

Who is the narrator in My Last Duchess?

The poem’s narrator is the duke of Ferrara, who comments dispassionately on the portrait of his late wife hanging on the wall, remarking on the duchess’s innocence and character.

How did the last duchess die?

It isn’t explicitly spelled out, but we can reasonably infer that the duchess was killed on the orders of her husband. As he explains to the Count’s emissary in chilling, matter-of-fact language, he gave commands, and then all the Duchess’s smiles stopped.

Is the Duke a reliable narrator?

The Duke is not a reliable narrator. Anger and jealousy, which are reflected in exclamations such as “Sir, ’twas all one!” (line 25), influence his view of the Duchess. The Duke’s descriptions of the Duchess, like his claim that “her looks went everywhere” (line 24), are not what they at first appear to be.

What flaw does the Duke identify in his last duchess?

Using abundant detail, Browning leads the reader to conclude that the Duke found fault with his former wife because she did not reserve her attentions for him, his rank, and his power.

What is the main message in My Last Duchess?

“My Last Duchess” is all about power: the political and social power wielded by the speaker (the Duke) and his attempt to control the domestic sphere (his marriage) in the same way that he rules hi…

Why did the Duke kill his last duchess?

How did the Duke kill the duchess? In the poem “My Last Duchess” the Duke of Ferrara has killed his wife because he believes that she has been unfaithful to him.

Who is most likely the speaker of the poem My Last Duchess?

Alfonso II d’EsteThe poem is preceded by the epigraph “Ferrara:”, indicating that the speaker is most likely Alfonso II d’Este, the fifth Duke of Ferrara (1533–1598), who, at the age of 25, married Lucrezia di Cosimo de’ Medici, the 14-year-old daughter of Cosimo I de’ Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, and Eleonora di Toledo.

Why does the Duke most likely point out his statue of Neptune taming a sea horse to his visitor lines 54 55?

 The Duke wants the listener to “notice” a bronze sculpture of “Neptune … / Taming a sea-horse” (lines 54–55). … The Duke refers to the Count’s daughter as his “object” (line 53). o Madness: The Duke might have had the Duchess killed because of his obsessive jealousy.

What does the reader learn about the Duke through his description of the Duchess?

The reader also learns that the Duke is jealous and possessive of the Duchess. He dismisses the compliments Frà Pandolf pays the Duchess as “such stuff” (line 19). Also, he implies his displeasure that the Duchess is pleased by something other than him.

How is the Duke portrayed in My Last Duchess?

The Duke: Browning reveals the Duke’s character through the words the man uses to describe his deceased wife. The audience learns that the Duke is cruel, jealous, proud, and arrogant. He suggests that he has killed his wife because she was not grateful enough to him for marrying her.

What does the Duke say about dowry?

Near the end of the monologue he says, “I repeat, / The Count your master’s known munificence / Is ample warrant that no just pretence / Of mine for dowry will be disallowed.” So he is repeating what he has already told this man, showing that the dowry was uppermost in his mind.

What does all smiles stopped in line 46 imply?

The final lines of the poem confirm the Duke’s obsession with power: He is a possessive, controlling man. Because the Duchess “smiled” (line 43) at others, the Duke “gave commands” (line 45) so that “all smiles stopped together” (line 46), which may be a euphemism for having the Duchess killed or at least silenced.

What bothered the Duke about the Duchess’s smile?

The duke wanted his wife to smile at no one but himself. The duchess’ smiles to the other men aroused an anger in the duke so powerful that he gave commands to have her killed. His jealousy stemmed from his perceived lack of control that he had over his wife.

How does Browning further develop the character of the Duke in lines 34 43?

Analyze how Browning further develops the character of the Duke in lines 34–43 (e.g., Browning further develops the Duke’s character by providing clues about how the Duke may have treated the Duchess while she was alive.