Quick Answer: Why Do Northerners Say Aye?

What country says aye?

What is the status of ‘aye.

‘ General impressions suggest that ‘aye’ means ‘yes’ in Scotland, a chunk of Northern England, and presumably Northern Ireland.

But beyond that, the picture of where the word is spoken, and even where it was spoken in the past, gets fuzzy..

What is the Scottish word for beautiful?

BonnieFemale | A quintessential Scottish name that will never go out of fashion, Bonnie is the Scots word for beautiful, pretty, stunning and attractive. Bonnies tend to have an inimitable personality.

What does ay or aye mean?

: yes aye, aye, sir. aye. noun. \ ˈī \ variants: or less commonly ay.

How do you use aye?

“Aye” means yes. It was originally a Navy term. Sailors would say “Aye, aye, sir” to mean “I understand your order and I will do it.” Sometimes in parliamentary voting, people will verbally vote on a bill by saying aye (yes) or nay (no).

Why do Marines say aye sir?

Out in the Marine Corps (and its sister service, the Navy) , the distinction is simple: “Yes, sir” is a response to a Yes/No question, whereas “Aye aye, sir” is a response to an order and means “I understand and will comply.”

What is the Scottish word for wife?

Dictionary of the Scots Language:: SND :: wife.

What does Dinna fash mean?

don’t worryDinna fash A reassuring phrase meaning ‘don’t worry’.

What does ye ken mean in Scottish?

Ye ken, no whit ah mean – You know, do you know what I mean. A cannie mind, ma heids away – I can’t remember/think. Dinnae – Don’t.

What does the slang word Aye mean?

YesAYE means “Yes”.

Is Aye Irish or Scottish?

Yes, this is also spelt ay. It is not only Irish; it is very common in contemporary Scottish English, and some Northern English dialects. (Confusingly, ay or aye can also mean ‘ever’, but pronounced [eI], to rhyme with day.)

What does Yes Aye mean?

The word aye (/aɪ/), as a synonym for yes in response to a question, dates to the 1570s and, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary, is of unknown origin; it may derive as a variation of the word I (in the context of “I assent”); as an alteration of the Middle English yai (“yes”), or from the adverb aye (meaning …

What is YES in Old English?

The English word ‘yes’ is thought to come from the Old English word ‘gēse’, meaning ‘may it be so’, and can be traced back to earlier than the 12th century. In the centuries since, lots of alternatives to the word ‘yes’ have sprung up in the English language, and there are no many meanings for the word ‘yes’ too.

What is Scottish for goodbye?

The Scottish translation of “goodbye” is. cheerio the nou.

Do Irish say aye?

Do Irish say aye? Yes, this is also spelt ay. It is not only Irish; it is very common in contemporary Scottish English, and some Northern English dialects. (Confusingly, ay or aye can also mean ‘ever’, but pronounced [eI], to rhyme with day.)

What does Aye mean in Scottish?

instead of yesWe also commonly say aye instead of yes, wee instead of small, ken instead of know and uch instead of oh. Aye, it’s getting a wee bit harder noo. Then you’ve got words like caiket and mocket, both meaning dirty, and hacket, meaning ugly.

What do Scots call a baby?

Bairn is a Scots, Scottish English, and Northern English term for a child.

Why do Aussies say aye?

‘Aye’ meaning Commonly used in Australia. It is usually tacked on to the end of sentences to finalize what you are saying to someone. It is often used for no reason at all. It’s apparently more commonly used by Queenslanders.

How do you say yes in Rastafarian?

To say “hello”, use: “Wa gwaan” or “Yes I”. To say “goodbye”, use: “Me a go”, or “Lickle bit”. To say “thank you”, use: “Give thanks” or “Praise Jah”.

Why do Scots say wee?

Derived from wee, meaning little, and ane meaning one, wean is a word most commonly used in the West of Scotland to refer to a young child, and is sometimes also spoken as wee yin or ‘little one’. Wee is a word whose current meaning is in little dispute, but whose origins are interesting and complex.

Is Aye an English word?

Aye means yes; used in some dialects of British English.